COMEDY CENTRAL STAND UP VENEZUELA EMILIO LOVERA

Chavismo can’t exactly deny the fact that you can’t find sugar at the store—or milk, or rice, or soap, or diapers, or just about anything. Of course, many of these armed Chavistas are facing the same problems obtaining basic goods as anyone else, and even their loyalty can’t be entirely taken for granted. Chile’s Michelle Bachelet is at 26 percent approval, Peru’s Ollanta Humala is at 15 percent, and just ahead of her ouster earlier this month, Brazil’s Dilma Roussef was at 9 percent. Abadi stresses that the country has gone through the traumatic process of lifting controls many times in the past and has experience with both gradual and shock therapy reforms. But for all the sloganeering, Venezuela made the same mistakes in an almost stunningly predictable sequence that left the country ruined—a mirror image of the Soviet bloc a quarter-century ago. Armed and Delusional Most Venezuelans don’t buy the blather about “economic war. It’s a perfect circle.

The Polish case is, actually, one that an increasing number of Venezuelan economists are revisiting. An unending stream of propaganda pours out of the government’s sprawling media empire, beating the drums about “economic warfare”: While the country is slipping ever faster into repression, reputable polling continues to be carried out and, if anything, tends to undercount the government’s supporters. To give Venezuela a jumpstart out of the crisis, the level of imports has to increase—basic staples, food, medicines, raw materials. It’s easy to mock this “Bolivarian militia” as a bunch of grannies with guns, and a May 22 nationwide military exercise necessary because, of course, the Americans will be invading any day now didn’t do much to dispel the view that they’re a motley crew very far from operational readiness. It’s a perfect circle.

It’s the macroeconomics of Rip Van Winkle. Anabella Abadi, a Caracas-based researcher, recently co-wrote a book on the history of Venezuelan price controls since As stand-up comedian Emilio Lovera puts it, Venezuela must be the only country in the world where it’s considered ,overa for you to walk into a bread shop and ask, “Do you have any bread?

The explanation for shortages and inflation amounts to alleging there’s a cartel not in one product market but in every product market, an enormous, sprawling perfect scheme where tens of thousands of businesspeople coordinate seamlessly, every single one of them passing up the enormous windfall profits that would accrue to him from defection.

For chavismo, the answer is simple: Take the economic catastrophe now engulfing the country. That price controls would cause venezuels is one of the least surprising results in economics. But chavismo long ago emiloo that enormously infuriating rhetorical strategy loveta repurposing evidence of its own failure into a defense of its worldview. The Polish case is, actually, one that an increasing number of Venezuelan economists are revisiting.

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Respected Venezuelan economists like Pedro Palma, the former president of Venezuela’s National Academy of Economic Sciences, and Carlos Machado Allison, the country’s most noted agricultural economist, sounded the alert again and again.

Other polls have him a smidgen lower. Of course that will only increase the size of the external gap, so massive financing will be needed. Chile’s Michelle Bachelet is at 26 percent approval, Peru’s Ollanta Humala is at 15 percent, and just ahead of her ouster earlier this month, Brazil’s Dilma Roussef was at 9 percent.

Powers Maduro has recently awarded himself, unilaterally, through an “economic emergency” decree that suspends key constitutional rights. And what does the government need to counter this kind of conspiracy? And how much support is the country going to need from abroad to keep a complete humanitarian disaster at bay?

And so all the old debates are new again: Armed and Delusional Most Venezuelans don’t buy the blather about “economic war. Is it possible to sustain political support for a transition package that could cause serious social dislocation in the short term?

All they could have told you, for sure, is that something had to give. Of course, many of these armed Chavistas are facing the same problems obtaining basic goods as anyone else, and even their loyalty can’t be entirely taken for granted.

The numbers Maduro is pulling are nobody’s idea of good approval ratings, granted, but he remains more popular than plenty of other Latin American leaders whose economies are doing much, much better than Venezuela’s: And they’ve proven wildly effective; it’s hard to imagine how the Venezuelan economy could have slid this far into chaos without provoking a major violent response if not for the pro-government extremists with guns around every corner.

The problem is that stubborn third of the population that still buys into chavismo’s cult-like narrative.

Chavismo sold itself explicitly as “socialism of the 21st century,” vowing both a heightened awareness of and a smilio to sidestep the errors of its 20th century forerunners. Yet, these shortages appear to be part of a concerted action by members of the opposition to remove the democratically-elected government from power.

The government has deep ties with many colectivos, and while the relationship isn’t always smooth, Maduro has already shown a willingness to turn to them to do the dirty business when protests threaten to overwhelm his forces. It’s a perfect circle. The claims are utter gobbledygook.

Chavismo can’t exactly deny the fact that you can’t find sugar at the store—or milk, or rice, or soap, or diapers, or just stanv anything. This is straight out of the playbook of the failed socialist states of the 20th century, the kind of thing George Orwell made a career of denouncing. They are, of course, getting ahead of themselves. That’s the kind of number that gets you thrown out of office in South America, not 31 percent.

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Emilio Lovera y la Piñata Latinoamericana

But alongside this mass movement there’s a smaller, much more sinister group of paramilitary organizations: It’s depressing that Poland’s case turns out to be so instructive. He could not rely on the regular military to back him in extreme circumstances. They’re there to dissuade opposition protesters, as well as any military commander who may be harboring thoughts of a coup. What is to be done about the hundreds of thousands of workers who now take home salaries from state-owned firms that lose money while doing nothing of economic value?

The warnings weren’t just ignored; they were jujitsued by official propaganda into proof of just how sprawling the conspiracy against the government really is.

How much reform is enough and how much is too much?

Since then, the government has carefully nurtured a sprawling system of parallel armed groups, including a huge state-organized militia movement that’s now active in virtually every city, town, and village in the country.

With people standing in line for hours just to buy soap, annual inflation in the high triple figures with percentages heading into four emiljoand soldiers rustling goats because they’re not getting fed in their barracks, Venezuela reads like a textbook example of the socialist endgame: Why, more powers, of course!

Emilio Lovera Performs At Bank United Center | JLN Photography & Wire Services

An unending stream of propaganda pours out of the government’s sprawling media empire, beating the drums about “economic warfare”: Surely, by the time local governors start saying things like “We are capable of eating a stick, or instead of frying two loverx, fry two rocks, and we will eat fried rocks” on the radio, things can’t go on like this much longer, can they?

Getty Images Pick up a newspaper these days and it seems obvious that Venezuela’s catastrophic experiment with socialism is at an end. Like all good cults, it has made itself central to the lives and identities of its followers.

How can Maduro possibly have retained the support of a third of the country?